Sleep Loss Induced Diabetes – Best Proven Way to Win

First and foremost, sleep loss increases the risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Most of all, more than a third of Americans routinely suffer from sleep loss because they don’t sleep the recommended 7 to 8 hours.

In addition, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in 2017 reported that more than 100 million Americans either have diabetes or are prediabetes. Also, the CDC reports that nearly 1 in 4 Americans with diabetes don’t know they have it. And lastly almost 90 percent of prediabetes Americans aren’t aware of their condition.

sleep loss

What is Diabetes

When your body causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than normal, you have diabetes (or hyperglycemia). Also, type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes.

What is Insulin

First and foremost, the pancreas produce the hormone insulin. Also, insulin enables cells in tissues and muscles to absorb glucose from blood in circulation.  Most of all, tissues and muscles use the glucose to generate energy.

Regrettably, cells can become resistant to insulin. As a result, the cells are less able to absorb the glucose in the blood. And, this is called insulin resistance. As a consequence, the pancreas make extra insulin.

But, if this continues for a long time, the pancreas aren’t able to make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose levels normal. As a result your blood glucose levels rise. And you have what is called type 2 diabetes.

On the other hand, sometimes the pancreas stop producing enough insulin. And because there isn’t enough insulin, cells can’t absorb enough of the blood glucose. Which also results in blood glucose levels to stay high.

In conclusion, Type 2 diabetes develops, if over time, blood glucose levels continue to stay high, cells continue to stay resistant to insulin, or the pancreas stop producing enough insulin.

Role of Sleep Loss

Regrettably, one side effect of frequent sleep loss episodes is the potential for development of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, when you aren’t able to sleep 8 hours frequently your body suffers.

Circadian Rhythm

Persistent sleep loss affects the circadian rhythm. In fact, disruptions to the circadian clock reduces the effectiveness of insulin and over time contributes to insulin resistance.

Moreover, the latest research indicates that insulin also operates on a daily cycle. And the circadian clock controls this cycle by changing the timing of production and release of insulin by the pancreas. In addition, there are times of the day when cells are more sensitive and less sensitive to insulin.

Pancreas

Sleep loss also appears to affect the health of cells in the pancreas. In fact, sleep loss creates stress in pancreatic cells and also disrupts blood glucose levels.

Insulin

Most noteworthy, Stage 3 of the sleep cycle, also known as deep sleep or slow-wave sleep, is important for the body to be able to use insulin for regulating blood glycose or sugar.

And, research shows that sleep loss and poor-quality sleep:

  1. First of all, decreases insulin sensitivity, which means your body has a harder time using the insulin
  2. Also decreases the speed and effectiveness of the body to remove glucose from the bloodstream.

Studies Relating Sleep Loss to Diabetes

First of all, a study of 54,000 adults, reported that those who slept less than 6 hours or more than 9 hours are significantly more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

In addition, a meta-analysis of 11 studies reported that the risk of type 2 diabetes goes up as sleep loss increases as well as when they sleep become longer than 9 hours. In fact, the risk of getting type 2 diabetes was least with regular 7 to 8 hours of sleep.

Finally, four large studies reported a strong relationship between frequent sleep loss and risk of developing diabetes.

Above all, studies show that those who suffer from frequent sleep loss take up to 40% longer to properly regulate blood sugar after a high-carb meal. As a result, over time, the pancreas are subjected to added stress. And this can lead to type 2 diabetes.

What You Can Do

Existing Type 2 Diabetes – Combination of Aerobic & Resistance Workouts

Most of all, if you suffer from frequent sleep loss, you can exercise. In fact, a study reported that combining aerobic workout with resistance training improved glycemic levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Moreover, the study reported that combining aerobic exercise with resistance training had better results that each workout on its own.

Not Diagnosed With Diabetes – Combination of Aerobic & Resistance Workouts

Following up on the combination concept, another study looked at the effect on potentially preventing or at least delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes caused by frequent sleep loss episodes. So, the study, in the Journal of Diabetes Investigations, reported that the combination resulted in at least delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes.

Description

Meanwhile, the study involved 10,680 Japanese women with an average age of 57.8 years. Also, these women had a mean BMI of 23.2 kg/m2. And these women participated in an exercise program with 24 minutes of combined aerobic workout and resistance training followed by 6 minutes of stretching.

In addition, the women were grouped into four categories, depending on the number of exercise sessions they attended over a 5 month period.

  1. First of all, category 1 consisted of women who attended 67 to 125 sessions
  2. Next, category 2 consisted of women who attended 55 to 66 sessions
  3. Next, category 3 consisted of women who attended 42 to 54 sessions
  4. Finally, category 4 consisted of women who attended 1 to 41 sessions

Results

And, the study reported that women in category 1 had the lowest risk of getting diabetes. Next, women in category 2 also had low risk of getting diabetes. Finally, women in category 3 had about the same risk of getting type 2 diabetes as the women in category 4.

Most noteworthy, researchers found a negative linear relationship between number of sessions and risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Moreover, this negative linear relationship applied to women in all four categories. Which means that the more they worked out, the lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Furthermore, in each category, researchers found that women with lower BMI had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than women with higher BMI.

Conclusion

Above all,  resistance training increased skeletal muscle mass. And, the aerobic workouts used those larger muscle mass to absorb and convert to energy, more blood glucose. As a result, blood glucose levels fell and more fat was burned.

In conclusion, going on an aerobic workout combined with resistance training program is a good way to counteract the downsides from sleep loss. Moreover, the workout program may help make sleep loss less frequent.

About the Author Lisa Anderson

My name is Lisa and I am the content editor.